THE CATHOLIC ART OF PAUL GAUGUIN

As is well known, Paul Gauguin and Vincent Van Gogh lived together for a disastrous three months. Among the many disagreements they had was the question of depicting iconographic images. For Van Gogh, a Protestant, that was anathema. For Gauguin, who was Jesuit educated, it was essential. Although he was fleeting in his practice of Catholicism (he embraced Buddhism and Theosophy as well), the iconography Gauguin had been exposed to was in his DNA. As many will sophistically point out, Gauguin was hardly a model of morality, but much of the negativity about him is exaggerated and/or downright myth (i.e. he left his job, wife and children to go paint. Actually, the stock market crashed and he lost his job, after which his wife, being used to a more substantial income, kicked him out). Still, ultimately, Gauguin was an aesthetic Catholic and, for a painter that is perfect. There have been several superb books and articles on the religious art of Gauguin, who, for me, with El Greco, is the most essential of Catholic painters.

Christmas Night 1902

Self-Portrait with Yellow Christ 1891

Self-Portrait with Yellow Christ 1891

Adam and Eve, Expulsion from Paradise 1889

Breton Calvary 1898

Breton Woman In Prayer 1894

Eve, Don’t Listen to the Liar 1889

Hail Mary 1891

Joan Of Arc 1889

Month of Maria 1899

Nativity 1896

Self Portrait with Halo 1889

Tahitian Eve 1892

Tahitian Eve 1892

Eve 1892

Eve- The Nightmare 1892

The Day of God 1895

The Day of the God, 1894

The Encounter 1892

The Green Christ 1889

The House of Hymns 1892

The Universe is Created, 1894

The Yellow Christ 1889

Vision After the Sermon 1888

Le Paradis Perdu 1890

Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going? 1897

The Nativity 1896

Tahitian Nativity 1896

We Hail Thee Mary 1891

LA LONTANANZA NOSTLAGICA UTOPICA FUTURA (short film)

http://www.theindependentcritic.com/la_lontananza_nostalgica_utopica_futura

THE FILM IS ALSO TEMPORARILY AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING (WITH STATEMENT) @

http://366weirdmovies.com/la-lontananza-nostalgica-utopica-futura-2014/

IMDB LISTING

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4258080/?ref_=nm_flmg_dr_2  James Mannan as Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.James Mannan as V. Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.

LA LONTANANZA SHOOT 8Alfred Eaker as Gauguin (ravaged by syphilis) in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.LA LONTANANZA SHOOTLA LONTANANZA SHOOT 2Alfred Eaker as Gauguin2 (ravaged by syphilis) in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.James Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh,  in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futuraJames Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.

Rogue Cinema’s review for our film: La Lontananza nostalgica utopica futura.

http://www.roguecinema.com/la-lontananza-nostalgica-utopica-2014-by-brian-morton.html

Co-directed by James Mannan and Alfred Eaker.

Written by Alfred Eaker

Starring James Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh and Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin.

Edited by J. Ross Eaker

Makeup: Jen Ring

Camera: J.Ross Eaker

Produced by Eaker Productions, LLC and Liberty or Death Productions, LLC

Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura II James Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh,  in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura Alfred Eaker as Gauguin2 (ravaged by syphilis) in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. Alfred Eaker as Gauguin (ravaged by syphilis) in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. James Mannan as V. Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. James Mannan as Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. James Mannan as VG in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.LA LONTANANZA SHOOTLA LONTANANZA SHOOT 1LA LONTANANZA SHOOT 2LA LONTANANZA SHOOT 3LA LONTANANZA SHOOT 4LA LONTANANZA SHOOT 7LA LONTANANZA SHOOT 8James Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura (human misery)

Behind the scenes of the short film ” La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura” ( a short film about the quest for sacred art in Paul Gauguin and Vincent Van Gogh)

James Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.Alfred Eaker as Gauguin (ravaged by syphilis) in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. Alfred Eaker as Gauguin2 (ravaged by syphilis) in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. James Mannan as V. Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. James Mannan as Van Gogh in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura. James Mannan as VG in La lontananza nostalgica utopia futura.

Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin (literally becoming his self-portrait jug and ravaged with syphilis), and Jams Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh (before and after this death) in the short film we are doing for John Herron School of Art: “La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura.” It is about the relationship between the two artists and their quest for sacred art. Written by Alfred Eaker, Co-directed by Alfred Eaker and James Mannan, DP: Justin Eaker. Makeup: Jen Ring. Sound: Bret Robinson, James Mannan. Produced by Eaker Productions LLC and Liberty or Death Productions, LLC.
©2013 Alfred Eaker
Alfred Eaker as Gauguin in La ...
Alfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura IIAlfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin, James Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh,  in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futuraJames Mannan as Vincent Van Gogh,  in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futuraAlfred Eaker as Paul Gauguin in La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura (human misery)

A LUCID & ENTHUSIASTIC HOMAGE TO A GREAT ARTIST

“Oh, I hate that man. He left his wife and children, was cruel to Van Gogh, and bedded down all those Tahitian girls. I just cannot look at his paintings.” This is a simple-minded, uninformed, dull, and predictable comment that I have little patience or tolerance for, and I have heard it countless times whenever I list Paul Gauguin among the painters I identify with aesthetically. Several films have been made about about Gauguin, yet none of them have caught his essence, at least until this documentary by Waldemar Januszczak. It is not a perfect film, but Gauguin is vividly present in it.

Donald Sutherland starred as Gauguin in the 1986 film Oviri, directed by Henning Carlson. In that film, the banker Gauguin and his wife, Matte, are on a Sunday horse and carriage ride with his co-workers and their wives. The financiers engage in shop talk while Gauguin broods. Finally, the frustrated painter taps the carriage driver on the shoulder and tells him to stop. Gauguin looks at his wife and peers and says, “You are my jailers.” With that, he jumps out of the carriage and walks off to find his paradise. A nice story but one that is a total fiction, buying into the painter’s mythology.

In actuality, Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), contrary to the repeated myths, was not a millionaire banker. He was a successful stock broker. He did not quit his job. The stock market crashed and he lost his job. Gauguin, who had been a “Sunday” painter for years, felt that this was reason enough to pursue painting full time, something he had been longing to do. It was with this that his wife left him. Gauguin did not desert his wife and five children. His wife rejected him after he lost his income as a stockbroker.

Art critic Waldemar Januszczak attempts to set the record straight. “What’s to like about this man?,” Januszczak asks. “First of all, there is the art, which needs no defense. Gauguin painted some of the world’s most alluring woman and put them into several of the world’s most gorgeous pictures, but what I really like about him is that he did it for big and noble reasons.” And then, most aptly, he says, “There is always more to a Gauguin than meets the eye.” Januszczak covers those “big and noble reasons,” but falls a little short in the “more than meets the eye” comment (more on that later).

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