A KARLOFFIAN SIX PACK OF LOONEY TUNE DOCTORS

House Of Frankenstein Lobby Card (Boris Karloff)

When Hammer Horror offered its premier director, Terence Fisher, his own franchise, he chose to work with the Frankenstein character rather than Dracula. Fisher was astute enough to realize that Mary Shelly’s saga had more potential for expansion and innovation. Even so, Fisher was hampered Universal Studio’s preexisting model of dos and don’ts. Once Boris Karloff forever removed Jack Pierce’s iconic makeup, the Monster became a lumbering bore played by lesser actors (Lon Chany, Jr., Bela Lugosi, Glenn Strange) and directed by hacks.

House of Frankenstein Lobbycard . Glenn Strange, Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney, Jr.

For his part, Karloff, in a variety of films, essentially took on the role of Dr. Frankenstein (in all but name). His Dr. Niemann was certainly the most colorful highlight in the assembly line monster mash House of Frankenstein (1944). Most regrettably, Niemann himself did not dispose of the whiny hunchback (J. Carrol Naish), Wolf Man (Chaney Jr.), or the irritatingly bland protagonists. While John Carradine’s Transylvanian count at least had a degree of personality, his screen time was brief. Briefer still was the monster (Strange) seen in a lethargic, somnolent state. When he finally awoke, his only threat was curing us of insomnia. This left Karloff to salvage what was left of the movie, and he did just that in a most entertaining way (unfortunately, the sequel, 1945’s House of Dracula, only had Carradine to attempt a rescue, which he failed to do). Of course, the doctor was infinitely more interesting than the monster here because he was played by the vastly superior, original monster. Fisher obviously realized this shift, paving the path for his Frankenstein series, which was actually about Frankenstein (the doctor, not the monster).

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Karloff’s run as a mad doctor actually got its start in 1936, one year after his role in Bride Of FrankensteinThe Man Who Changed His Mind (aka The Man Who Lived Again) was made for a UK Production company and directed by Robert Stevenson. The formulaic script is aided considerably by witty dialogue from the scriptwriters (including John L. Balderston, who penned Universal’s Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, and Bride of Frankenstein); ripe, eccentric performances; and Stevenson’s fast-clipped pacing.

The Man Who Lived Again (aka The Man Who Changed His Mind) lobby card (Boris Karloff)

 

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