THE CATHOLIC ART OF PAUL GAUGUIN

As is well known, Paul Gauguin and Vincent Van Gogh lived together for a disastrous three months. Among the many disagreements they had was the question of depicting iconographic images. For Van Gogh, a Protestant, that was anathema. For Gauguin, who was Jesuit educated, it was essential. Although he was fleeting in his practice of Catholicism (he embraced Buddhism and Theosophy as well), the iconography Gauguin had been exposed to was in his DNA. As many will sophistically point out, Gauguin was hardly a model of morality, but much of the negativity about him is exaggerated and/or downright myth (i.e. he left his job, wife and children to go paint. Actually, the stock market crashed and he lost his job, after which his wife, being used to a more substantial income, kicked him out). Still, ultimately, Gauguin was an aesthetic Catholic and, for a painter that is perfect. There have been several superb books and articles on the religious art of Gauguin, who, for me, with El Greco, is the most essential of Catholic painters.

Christmas Night 1902

Self-Portrait with Yellow Christ 1891

Self-Portrait with Yellow Christ 1891

Adam and Eve, Expulsion from Paradise 1889

Breton Calvary 1898

Breton Woman In Prayer 1894

Eve, Don’t Listen to the Liar 1889

Hail Mary 1891

Joan Of Arc 1889

Month of Maria 1899

Nativity 1896

Self Portrait with Halo 1889

Tahitian Eve 1892

Tahitian Eve 1892

Eve 1892

Eve- The Nightmare 1892

The Day of God 1895

The Day of the God, 1894

The Encounter 1892

The Green Christ 1889

The House of Hymns 1892

The Universe is Created, 1894

The Yellow Christ 1889

Vision After the Sermon 1888

Le Paradis Perdu 1890

Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going? 1897

The Nativity 1896

Tahitian Nativity 1896

We Hail Thee Mary 1891

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